[T1/2.2] – Amber 5
 
Developing The Virtual Physiological Human: Tools, Techniques And Best Practices For Data Exchange, Storage, and Publication

 

Abstract

We will demonstrate tools, techniques and best practices that aid scientists in the development and application of mathematical models and computational simulation experiments in their work toward the creation of a virtual physiological human. The Physiome Model Repository (PMR; http://models.physiomeproject.org/) provides a framework for the storage, curation, description, and exchange of data. By using standards appropriate for their data, scientists maximize their ability to reuse existing knowledge and enable others to make use of their achievements in novel work. The tutorial will begin with a series of presentations introducing the central concepts of the PMR, the software tools OpenCOR and MAP client, and some best practice guidelines which facilitate the finding, use, and sharing of data across the Physiome Project. OpenCOR (http://opencor.ws/) is an editing, simulation and annotation tool for models encoded in the CellML format (http://cellml.org/). The Musculoskeletal Atlas Project (MAP) client (http://map-­‐client.readthedocs.org/) is a software framework that integrates disparate software tools into a streamlined workflow of processing steps to achieve specific objectives spanning many aspects of the virtual physiological human. Following the introductory presentations, the speakers and other members of each of these projects will be available to help attendees work through prepared tutorials addressing various common scenarios that these tools are designed to achieve. These tutorials are designed to help demonstrate and promote practices that will aid attendees in their own work. Attendees are also encouraged to raise issues specifically related to their work with the tutors.

Organizers

Dr. David Nickerson and Prof Peter Hunter – FRS Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland New Zealand

 

List of Speakers:

David Nickerson Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland New Zealand
Peter Hunter Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland New Zealand
Poul Nielsen Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland New Zealand
Hugh Sorby Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland New Zealand