Mini-Symposia

Advances in Sleep Health Using Novel Approaches in Data Analytics and technology. Part 1: Advancing Sleep Informatics

Summary:

It is well recognized that sleep is a basic human need, crucial for our general health and well-being. The short-term effects of poor sleep quality include negative effects on our attention span, memory and learning ability. The longer-term effects are still being studied, but poor sleep quality or sleep deprivation has been linked to significant health problems and large economic costs due to lost productivity. Sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea, insomnia and short sleep duration, are all risk factors that adversely affect health and can lead to diseases such as high blood pressure, ischemic heart disease, stroke and diabetes.  Even though polysomnography continues to be the most widely used technique to detect sleep disorders, portable devices and wearables are progressively becoming more accurate and widely accepted for monitoring sleep health. In parallel, (explainable) deep learning models are being integrated to enhance disease detection. Innovative models that combine Big Data with artificial intelligence while maintaining privacy are being developed. In this series of minisymposia, invited experts will present their recent contributions to specific areas in the informatics, diagnostics and therapeutics of sleep disorders, and discuss the issues that remain unresolved. This session focuses on recent developments in sleep informatics.

Rationale: This proposal continues the tradition of similarly themed minisymposia series on sleep that we have organized successfully for EMBC over the past 10 years. Year after year, these sessions have attracted considerable interest among EMBC attendees and fueled the impetus for subsequent discussions. The topics to be presented fall within the coverage of Theme 5: Cardiopulmonary Systems and Physiology-based Engineering.

 

 

PART 1:  ADVANCING SLEEP INFORMATICS

Wednesday July 17   8:30 – 10:00 am

Location: Fiesta 9 & 10

 

Chair & Co-Chair:

Ralf Seepold, Ph.D., Department of Computer Science, HTWG Konstanz, Germany &

Thomas Penzel, Ph.D., Interdisciplinary Sleep Medicine Centre, Charite University Hospital, Berlin, Germany.

 

Speakers:

  • Iris AM Huijben, Eindhoven University of Technology; Onera Health, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    “Looking beyond the hypnogram; alternative sleep representations”
  • Hisham ElMoaqet, PhD, Department of Mechatronics Engineering, School of Applied Technical Sciences, German Jordanian University, Amman, Jordan.

“Deep Learning Methods for Automated Detection in Sleep Signals”

  • Nicolai Spicher, PhD, University Medicine Göttingen, Institute for Medical Informatics, Göttingen, Germany.
    “Comparing the features of end-to-end sleep staging models processing polysomnogramns to clinical guidelines”

Mostafa Haghi (PhD) & Ralf Seepold (PhD), Ubiquitous Computing Lab, HTWG Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany.
“Comparative Study of Applying Signal Processing Techniques on Ballistocardiogram in Detecting J-Peak using Bi-LSTM model”

Organizers: Ralf Seepold{1} and Thomas Penzel{2}
{1}HTWG Konstanz—University of Applied Sciences, Germany; {2}Charite University Hospital, Germany

Advances in Sleep Health Using Novel Approaches in Data Analytics and technology. Part 2: Advancing Diagnostic Technology in Sleep Medicine

PART 2:  ADVANCING DIAGNOSTIC TECHNOLOGY IN SLEEP MEDICINE

Wednesday July 17   2:00 – 3:30 pm

Location: Fiesta 9 & 10

 

Chair & Co-Chair:

Philip de Chazal, Ph.D., Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Sydney, Australia & Thomas Penzel, Ph.D., Interdisciplinary Sleep Medicine Centre, Charite University Hospital, Berlin, Germany

 

Speakers:

  • Wenbin Shi, PhD , School of Information and Electronics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China.
    “Cardiopulmonary Coupling Analysis Based on Variational Mode Decomposition for Sleep Apnea Detection”
  • Raimon Jane, PhD, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain. “Improving the Diagnosis of Sleep Disorders in Patients with Neurological Disease using Multimodal mHealth Tools”

 

  • Yolanda Castillo-Escario, PhD, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain.

“Monitoring High-Resolution Sleep Position and its Variability in Adolescents with

Smartphone Accelerometers”

 

  • Thomas Penzel, Ph.D., Interdisciplinary Sleep Medicine Centre, Charite University Hospital, Berlin, Germany.

“Data sharing challenges in sleep medicine”

Organizers: Philip de Chazal{2}, Thomas Penzel{1}
{1}Charite University Hospital, Germany; {2}The University Of Sydney, Australia

Advances in Sleep Health Using Novel Approaches in Data Analytics and technology. Part 3: Advancing Physiology and Pathophysiology

PART 3:  ADVANCING PHYSIOLOGY AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

Wednesday July 17   11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Location: Fiesta 9 & 10

 

Chair & Co-Chair:

Michael C.K. Khoo, Ph.D., Alfred E.Mann Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA &

Philip de Chazal, Ph.D., Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Sydney, Australia.

 

Speakers:

  • Scott A. Sands, Ph.D., Sleep Disorders Research Program, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard University, Boston, USA.

“Advanced analysis of sleep studies for identifying treatment opportunities in sleep-disordered breathing”

 

  • Philip de Chazal, PhD, School of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

“Can polysomnogram derived autonomic and hypoxia measures predict incident cardiovascular disease?”

 

  • Rami Khayat, MD, Division of Pulmonary Diseases and Critical Care Medicine, University of California, Irvine, USA.

“New sensor technologies and how they impact patient care in sleep medicine: A clinician’s perspective”

  • Jihye Moon, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.
    “Sleepiness degree can be more accurately estimated from multiple speech sentences with machine learning: Preliminary study on a 25-hour sleep deprivation”

Organizers: Michael Khoo{3}, Philip de Chazal{4}, Scott Sands{1}, Rami Khayat{2}
{1}Harvard University, United States; {2}University of California, Irvine, United States; {3}University of Southern California, United States; {4}University of Sydney, Australia

Bridging the Gender Gap in Healthcare Research & Innovation: Digital Technologies for Women’s Health

Our mini-symposium brings together thought leaders, researchers, and practitioners from academia, industry, and global governance, to explore how digital technologies can address gender disparities in healthcare research, with a special focus on women’s health. We aim to foster interdisciplinary collaboration, catalyze advancements in digital health solutions for women, and generate actionable insights for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers. The symposium will include talks and a panel discussion by Dr. Aarti Sathyanarayana an Assistant Professor at Northeastern University and an expert in digital phenotyping and signal processing of ubiquitous devices; Dr. Jyotishman Pathak, a Professor at Weill Cornell Medical College and an expert in social determinants of mental health; Dr. David Novillo-Ortiz, the unit head of digital data at the World Health Organization; Dr. Sy Kyung Kim, an Assistant Professor at Thomas Jefferson University and an expert in mHealth interventions for economically disadvantaged women; and Emily Capodulipo, the Senior Vice President of Data Science and Research at WHOOP. The diverse perspectives of the speakers promise a comprehensive exploration of how technology can contribute to gender equity in healthcare research and innovation. Our expected outcomes include (i) generating increased awareness of gender disparities introduced by digital health technologies, (ii) fostering new collaboration across interdisciplinary and international teams, (iii) showcasing innovation with the potential to transform women’s healthcare, and (iv) formulating policy recommendations aimed at promoting gender-inclusive healthcare. Our symposium aspires to contribute to this year’s conference theme of “Technology’s promise for equity and access for well-health” by showcasing cutting-edge research and innovations that address the unique healthcare challenges faced by women, making significant strides toward a more inclusive and equitable healthcare future.

Organizers: Aarti Sathyanarayana{1}, Jyotishman Pathak{3}, Emily Capodilupo{4}, David Novillo-Ortiz{5}, Su Kyung Kim{2}
{1}Northeastern University, United States; {2}Thomas Jefferson University, United States; {3}Weill Cornell Medical College, United States; {4}WHOOP, Inc., United States; {5}World Health Organization, Denmark

Concept to Clinical Trials: Translating Technology from Benchtop to Bedside

The goal for many engineers in medicine and biology is to translate their innovative development into a clinical trial to demonstrate impact in patient care. This requires many steps from finding the right clinician partner, applying for appropriate regulation approval and exemption status, designing a clinical trial with the appropriate endpoints and statistical power, and supporting the technology development during the duration of the clinical trial. The goal of this session is to hear from 3 clinician-scientist pairs who have developed and tested technology in clinical trials in the areas of interventional radiology, surgery, and radiation oncology. The speakers will discuss how they navigated the steps described above, things that they learned during the process, and their advice to others embarking on these important endeavors. The examples will highlight technologies and clinical trials in image guided interventions and therapies, but the overall concepts will be broadly applicable to technology development and clinical translation.

Organizer: Kristy Brock
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, United States

Digital Biomarkers for Brain Health Outcomes

This mini symposium is dedicated to delving into cutting-edge research within the realm of digital biomarkers, with a specific focus on signal analytics and feature engineering towards establishing meaningful biomarkers and exploring their transformative impacts on successful aging. The event will serve as a dynamic platform for researchers and clinicians to present their latest and most innovative findings, providing attendees with valuable insights into extracting meaningful health information from digital sources. Attendees can expect presentations showcasing the state-of-the-art developments in innovative ideas and hypotheses in constructing biomarkers from data collected through different resources and how digital biomarkers serve as indicators for various complications in brain health. The talks will cover the role of digital biomarkers in cognitive aging, Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), stroke, and epilepsy. The symposium will not only contribute to the scientific discourse on this topic, but also offer a unique opportunity for knowledge exchange, fostering collaboration among professionals at the forefront of digital biomarker research for healthy aging.

Organizers: Peng Li{4}, Fei He{2}, Haoqi Sun{1}, Lei Gao{4}, Chandan Karmakar{3}
{1}Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, United States; {2}Coventry University, United Kingdom; {3}Deakin University, Australia; {4}Massachusetts General Hospital, United States

Digital Oncology: Supporting Clinical Trials with Biomedical Sensors and Wearables in Cancer Treatment and post-Cancer Follow Up

The availability and sophistication of mobile health (mHealth) technology (wearables, mobile technology, and sensors) continues to increase and can be considered to be part of what it could be defined as “Digital Health”. The integration of sensors, wearable devices and associated infrastructure is becoming of great importance into the cancer-care continuum, turning into “Digital Oncology”.

Organizer: Maria Eugenia Beltran Jaunsaras
Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain

Efforts from IEEE Standards Association in Improving Data Quality of Electronic Health Records

The mini symposium will provide insights to the audience on efforts made by IEEE Standards Association to develop guidelines for improving data quality associated with electronic health records. The symposium will include speakers from the industry and academia who are involved in this effort. The speakers will provide key insights to the existing problems associated with quality of data contained in electronic health record systems and on how their association with the IEEE Standards Industry Connect workgroup has helped them understand this problem and the importance of mitigating it. Overall, the purpose of the symposium is to highlight efforts made by IEEE to address some of the key issues in this problem domain.

Organizer: Varadraj Gurupur
University of Central Florida, United States

Electromyography Control Applications in Healthcare and Gesture Recognition Methods

This mini-symposium aims to delve into the advanced applications of electromyography (EMG) in healthcare, focusing on innovative control mechanisms and gesture recognition methods. Electromyography, a technique for the acquisition of the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles, has seen significant advancements in recent years, particularly in the realms of healthcare and human-computer interaction. Led by six distinguished experts, this mini-symposium will explore the dynamic intersection of EMG with advanced healthcare applications and interactive systems. Our expert speakers will present a comprehensive overview, beginning with the integration of high-density sensors and high-resolution sampling, pivotal in enhancing EMG accuracy and functionality. The discussion will extend to the latest in sensor fusion and sophisticated control algorithms, key in improving EMG user interaction. A special emphasis will be on the novel user-in-the-loop myoelectric system learning algorithms, a major advance in developing adaptive systems for daily use. These technological breakthroughs are spearheading a transformation in healthcare, especially in areas like stroke rehabilitation and prosthetic development, paving the way for solutions that are not only more efficient but also intuitively user-centric.

Organizers: Ulysse Côté-Allard{2}, Benoit Gosselin{1}
{1}Laval University, Canada; {2}University of Oslo, Norway

Engineering Neuroplasticity Through Understanding Neurophysiology – Take Home Messages for Electoral Stimulation After Spinal Cord Injury

The proposed workshop will present the discovery process and the latest findings in neurophysiology leading to development of novel therapeutic interventions and systems for restoration of neuromotor function after spinal cord injury (SCI). • Dr. James Guest will discuss design considerations of electrical neuromodulation approaches to address SCI induced changes in muscles resulting from loss of motor neurons, aberrant circuit formation leading to abnormal tone, and loss of ability to control movements discretely. • Dr. Milos Popovic will demonstrate that a combination of a newly invented pulse shape and dry electrodes can generate a more comfortable user experience during stimulation compared to conventional balanced biphasic stimulation pulses delivered using conventional electrodes. • Dr. Matija Milosevic will show how a non-invasive brain-spine interface neuromodulation approach can efficiently elicit neuroplasticity and discuss the importance of stimulation parameters to adequately activate the spinal networks to excite corticospinal circuits. • Dr. Atsushi Sasaki will show a neuromodulation approach for inducing corticospinal plasticity using a brain-controlled electrical stimulation approach and discuss the key role of timing between motor intention and electrical stimulation for effective neuroplasticity. • Dr. Dimitry Sayenko will show how “artificial” afferent inputs induced by epidural or transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation have the potential to enhance the excitability of spinal networks to amplify and restore voluntary movement function. The symposium will conclude with a panel discussion about future trends in neuromodulation to provide take home messages for electrical stimulation approaches after SCI.

Organizers: Matija Milosevic{2}, Atsushi Sasaki{2}, James Guest{2}, Milos Popovic{3}, Dimitry Sayenko{1}
{1}Houston Methodist Research Institute, United States; {2}University of Miami, United States; {3}University of Toronto, Canada

Equitable Digital Technology in Cardio-Respiratory Engineering

The mini-symposium on “Equitable Digital Technology in Cardio-Respiratory Engineering” seeks to explore the intersection of cutting-edge artificial intelligence (AI) and assistive technology to address pressing health challenges in the cardiovascular and respiratory disease management. This interdisciplinary event brings together experts from AI, health informatics, rehabilitation engineering, and clinical practice to advance the development of inclusive and equitable technological solutions. The symposium will delve into innovative methods for collecting and interpreting health data, crucial for fostering independent living and effective management of cardiovascular and respiratory conditions. As chronic conditions like sleep apnea, heart failure increasingly affect global populations, our discussions will extend to the implications of heart failure and sleep apnea. The symposium aims to shed light on the technologies that has been developed and implemented in heart failure and sleep apnea management. Attendees will gain insights into the latest algorithms and technologies that inform diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, striving for a shift towards personalized and accessible healthcare. This session promises to offer a collaborative platform for sharing transformative ideas, fostering equitable digital solutions in cardiorespiratory health, and setting a precedent for future innovation in the field.

Organizers: Azadeh Yadollahi, Shumit Saha
University Health Network, Canada

Experimental and Computational Techniques for Whole Organ Electrophysiology

Coordinated and rhythmic electrical events are critical for normal mechanical function of organs such as the heart, gastrointestinal tract and the uterus. Abnormalities in electrical conduction underpin a variety of debilitating disorders. Approximately 6% of the population suffer from abnormal cardiac rhythm, while disordered electrical events in the gastrointestinal tract have also been associated with gastroparesis and chronic nausea and vomiting. Functional disorders of the uterus (such as endometriosis) have recently been associated with disordered electrical conduction patterns. Novel therapies intended to improve an organ’s mechanical function may induce or exacerbate electrical dysfunction. In the heart, there are well established techniques to diagnose and treat electrical arrhythmias including ablation, and implantable pacemakers. However, in comparison, therapies for the gut and the uterus are less established. This mini-symposium will present novel invasive and non-invasive techniques for in-vivo quantification of the electrical activity in the heart, uterus and the gastrointestinal tract. Novel techniques for modulating the activity and function of these organs will also be discussed. It is anticipated that these novel techniques will eventually lead to new therapies.

Organizers: Leo Cheng{3}, Matthew Kay{1}, Jack Rogers{2}, Recep Avci{3}, Yong Wang{4}
{1}George Washington University, United States; {2}University of Alabama at Birmingham, United States; {3}University of Auckland, New Zealand; {4}Washington University in St Louis, United States

Fostering Equity in Science, Technology and Innovation: Insights and Best Practices in co-Creating Policy Recommendations

The objective of the mini-symposium is to explore the complexities involved in the co-creation of policy recommendations for promoting equity in the field of Science, Technology, and Innovation (STI). The session will gather experts sharing insights and lessons learned in the collaborative process, diving into discussions surrounding the intersection of gender, STI, and policy formulation. The discussion will involve diverse perspectives: Maria Fernanda Cabrera, expert in leading international projects for social inclusion; María Teresa Arredondo, founder of a leading European Research Center in ehealth; Yolanda Ursa, expert in incorporating gender equality aspects in international dialogues and agreements; Marlien Herselman, with broad expertise in open innovation applied to Diversity, Inclusion and Equity (DIE); Bárbara di Camilo, expert in AI applied to healthcare; Arianna Dagliati, expert in deep learning models for healthcare; May Wang, advocate for the DIE cause in scientific research; and Cristina López, young researcher on co-creation of accessible and inclusive ehealth solutions. This diverse panel will dissect the challenges and triumphs of fostering inclusivity, offering a methodology and practical tools for those committed to advancing equity in the STI landscape. It is a unique opportunity to absorb successful case studies, navigate obstacles, and harness the power of co-creation. The session is tailored for individuals and organizations passionate about shaping a more equitable future through innovative approaches to policy development, gaining a deeper understanding of the dynamics driving change in the realm of policies in STI.

Organizers: María Fernanda Cabrera{4}, María Teresa Arredondo{4}, Yolanda Ursa{3}, Marlien Herselman{1}, Bárbara Di Camilo{5}, Arianna Dagliati{6}, May Wang{2}, Cristina López{4}
{1}Council of Scientific & Industrial Research, South Africa; {2}Georgia Institute of Technology, United States; {3}Inmark Europa, Spain; {4}Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain; {5}University of Padova, Italy; {6}University of Pavia, Italy

Frontiers in non-invasive, non-Pharmaceutical Technologies for Movement Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke

Movement impairments following a stroke are a major cause of adult disability in the world. According to the World Stroke Organization, there are over 101 million people who have experienced stroke and over 50% of them will live with permanent or chronic disability. Specific motor impairments include muscle weakness, spasticity, and a loss of fine motor control with the emergence of a highly stereotyped pattern of coarse, multi-joint movements (clinically known as abnormal synergy). Interventions to augment routine clinical practice for post-stroke rehabilitation have been developing rapidly over the past two decades. However, the benefit to movement rehabilitation in the chronic phase is still limited. This mini-symposium will discuss new non-invasive, non-pharmaceutical technologies that support motor recovery in the chronic phase. They have fewer side effects and/or risks than pharmaceutical (such as botulinum toxin) and invasive technologies (such as deep brain stimulation); therefore, they may allow future use in the community and home-based environment. This symposium will be co-chaired by Dr. Yuan Yang and Dr. Jinsook Roh, including the following speakers. Dr. Jinsook Roh from the University of Huston (USA) will discuss muscle synergy-guided human-machine interaction to improve motor coordination after stroke. Dr. Xiaoling Hu from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong) will discuss a multi-modal rehabilitation system integrating exoskeletons, soft exo-muscles, exo-nerve stimulation, and tactile feedback to promote home-based rehabilitation. Dr. Hyung-soon Kim from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology (South Korea) will discuss soft wearable hand rehabilitation systems to improve motor function after stroke. Dr. Yuan Yang from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA) will introduce imaging- and computer-modeling-guided high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to improve the upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients. A panel discussion on the current challenges in the field will follow to explore the potential of the future use of proposed technologies in the community and home-based environment to support stroke rehabilitation toward a long-term socioeconomic benefit in chronic stroke care and nursing.

Organizers: Jinsook Roh{3}, Xiaoling Hu{1}, Hyung-Soon Park{2}, Yuan Yang{4}
{1}Hongkong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong; {2}Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Korea; {3}University of Huston, United States; {4}University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, United States

Harmonizing BME: Integrating Discipline-Based Biomedical Engineering Research and Biomedical Engineering Education

This mini-symposium, under the theme of Biomedical Engineering Education and Society (theme #11), aims to foster a dynamic dialogue between biomedical engineering (BME) researchers and educators. The goal is aligning research and teaching practices for effective workforce development in BME. Key discussion points will include: • Integration of Research and Teaching: Exploring ways to bring BME research into the classroom, its benefits, and potential challenges. • The Role of Research-Focused Capstone Projects, Internships, and Co-op Programs in Preparing Students for Practical Applications in Biomedical Engineering. • Best Practices to Synergize the BME Research and Teaching Spheres while promoting the sense of belonging and psychological well-being among BME students. • Developing Biomedical Engineers who are Lifelong Learners. Led by biomedical engineering education experts, this mini-symposium promises a rich discussion on harmonizing the BME research and education spheres for efficient workforce development.

Organizers: May Mansy{4}, Karin Jensen{5}, Alexandra Werth{1}, Harvey Borovets{6}, Raj Rao{3}, Mary Staehle{2}, Sindia Rivera-Jimenez{4}
{1}Cornell University, United States; {2}Rowan University, United States; {3}University of Arkansas, United States; {4}University of Florida, United States; {5}University of Michigan, United States; {6}University of Pittsburgh, United States

Improving Medical Adherence Using Design for All – Part 1

This mini-symposium aims to explore the transformative power of electronic product information (ePI) in addressing non-adherence to prescribed treatments. Emphasis will be on digital adaptation to meet patient needs, ensuring actionable, tailored information. Discussions will include economic, societal, and behavioral obstacles to health, with experts from IHI projects GRAVITATE HEALTH AND BEAMER. Equity in healthcare, a complex concept influenced by diverse patient factors like age, health, social status, and living situations, will be a key topic. We’ll delve into how algorithms can predict adherence behavior and how behavioral science and patient segmentation can enhance treatment adherence. The symposium will explore designing solutions that are accessible, inclusive, and user-friendly. A critical focus is on the ePI’s adaptability to individual patient contexts, enhancing understanding and efficiency in information consumption. This involves summarizing content, using iconography, and demoting irrelevant information. Co-creation of solutions will involve healthcare professionals, academia, and the pharma industry, offering practical insights. Participants and students will engage by posing challenges related to non-adherence. The event aims to provide insights beneficial to the clinical and research communities. Session 1: “Understanding Non-Adherence and Equity in Healthcare” features speakers like Giuseppe Fico discussing “VBHC for All: Non-Adherence and Healthcare Equity,” Beatriz Merino on “Beyond Prescription: Adherence to Treatment,” and Nicholas William Chiccone on “Synergizing Patient Care and Pharma Industry.”

Organizers: Giuseppe Fico{2}, Beatriz Merino-Barbancho{1}, Nicholas William Ciccone{3}, Francisco Lupiañez-Villanueva{4}
{1}BEAMER project, Spain; {2}European Alliance of Medical and Biological Engineering and Science (EAMBES), Spain; {3}Novonordisk, Denmark; {4}PredictBy, Italy

Improving Medical Adherence Using Design for All – Part 2

This mini-symposium aims to explore the transformative power of electronic product information (ePI) in addressing non-adherence to prescribed treatments. Emphasis will be on digital adaptation to meet patient needs, ensuring actionable, tailored information. Discussions will include economic, societal, and behavioral obstacles to health, with experts from IHI projects GRAVITATE HEALTH AND BEAMER. Equity in healthcare, a complex concept influenced by diverse patient factors like age, health, social status, and living situations, will be a key topic. We’ll delve into how algorithms can predict adherence behavior and how behavioral science and patient segmentation can enhance treatment adherence. The symposium will explore designing solutions that are accessible, inclusive, and user-friendly. A critical focus is on the ePI’s adaptability to individual patient contexts, enhancing understanding and efficiency in information consumption. This involves summarizing content, using iconography, and demoting irrelevant information. Co-creation of solutions will involve healthcare professionals, academia, and the pharma industry, offering practical insights. Participants and students will engage by posing challenges related to non-adherence. The event aims to provide insights beneficial to the clinical and research communities. Session 2: “Technological Innovations and Co-Creation for personalized ePI presentation to patients” features speakers MFernanda Cabrera discussing “the importance of language, culture for digital solutions for all,” Alejandro Medrano on “G-Lens focusing ePIs,” and Catherine Chronaki on “IPS; ePI, Persona Vector and the relevance of FHIR as standard for adherence”

Organizers: María Fernanda Cabrera{3}, Alejandro Medrano{1}, Catherine Chronaki{2}
{1}Gravitate Health project, Spain; {2}HL7 Europe, Belgium; {3}Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain

Innovations in Healthcare Access: a Multidisciplinary Exploration of Chronic Health Challenges Through Biomedical and Health Informatics

Chronic health conditions, ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to the complex sequelae of cancer survivorship, impose a significant burden on individuals and healthcare systems worldwide. These persistent health issues require innovative strategies for sustained management, particularly in healthcare access and quality improvement. Our mini-symposium aims to explore into these challenges from the perspective of Biomedical and Health Informatics (BHI). The discussions will be focused in the exploration of how digital health technologies, such as electronic health records, telehealth platforms, and patient data analytics, can be exploited to revolutionize chronic disease management. We will explore how artificial intelligence (AI) and big data analytics can identify patterns in large datasets of patient information, leading to more personalized and efficient healthcare strategies. Our mini-symposium will focus on the intersection of informatics, digital tools, and patient care, to enhance healthcare delivery through remote monitoring, patient engagement, and improved communication between providers and patients. We’ll highlight the role of global BHI initiatives in health equity, examining case studies and successful models to discuss universal health coverage and reducing healthcare access disparities. Interdisciplinary experts like data scientists, researchers, healthcare IT professionals, and policy advocates will collaborate on strategies for integrating informatics into chronic healthcare management. By focusing on the democratization of health informatics and its application in chronic health challenges, this mini-symposium aligns with the growing need for innovative, data-driven approaches in healthcare supported by the EMBC across the years. Our agenda: Opening Remarks (5’) Short talks (50’) -Harnessing AI and Big Data for personalized chronic disease management. Eugenio Gaeta, senior developer of AI solutions at Life Supporting Technologies. -Early detection of mental health disorders in chronic disease patients. Sergio Guillén, director of the Active Aging Association. -Data models and standardization for cross-domain integration. Giuseppe Fico, president elect of the EAMBES. -Enhancing treatment adherence through the co-creation of tailored solutions. María E. Beltrán, representative of PharmaLedger Association. Speakers Panel Discussion. Chair: María T. Arredondo, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (20’) Q&A (15’)

Organizer: Estefanía Estévez-Priego
Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Life Supporting Technologies Group, ETSIT, Spain

Investigating Sex-Based Differences in Cardiopulmonary Structure and Control

Across the globe there is almost a parity in the population among women and men; however, outside of clinical trials it is uncommon to find sex-balanced samples of subjects in most research studies and even less likely to find a targeted analysis of sex-based differences in the experimental outcomes. The objective of this mini-symposium is to provide a series of research presentations that provide examples of sex-based differences in the structure and/or control of the cardiopulmonary system. Although each talk will be delivered as an independent presentation, there will be a clear thematic connection across the mini-symposium. The first topic area will focus on the identification of sex-based differences in the central integration of peripheral respiratory sensor feedback through the analysis of breathing variability during steady-state resting and low levels of exercise. The second topic area will focus on sex-based differences in the heart, including anatomical structural, cardiac blood flow and blood energy. The third presentation will present a description of the sex-based differences in cardiopulmonary outcomes during sleep that result from acute and chronic opioid therapy. The final presentation will describe a stochastic modeling technique that can replicate and predict subtle differences in cardiopulmonary control, as demonstrated through the variability of breathing and heart-rate patterns. At the completion of this mini-symposium, attendees should expect to have gained an increased understanding and appreciation of sex-based differences in cardiopulmonary structure and control, and if applicable, include sex-based analyses in the design and implementation of their future research.

Organizers: Brett Busha{2}, Martha Stella{2}, Liang Zhong{1}, Azadeh Yadollahi{3}
{1}Duke-NUS Medical School Singapore, Singapore; {2}The College of New Jersey, United States; {3}Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Canada

Microrobotic Magnetic Technologies for Healthcare Applications

Over the last two decades, microrobotic magnetic technologies have undergone impressive advances in the area of minimally invasive medicine. The use of magnetic fields has emerged as a compelling approach, enabling the wireless manipulation of magnetic devices, known as micro- and nanorobots, within the human body. Magnetic fields are attractive for their biocompatibility across a wide range of frequencies and magnitudes, as well as for their versatility in maneuvering objects. With a suitable design and specific magnetic inputs (i.e., gradients, rotating, or oscillating magnetic fields), magnetic tools can achieve different locomotion mechanisms. Magnetic technologies have also facilitated the activation of additional functionalities in magnetic micro- and nanorobots, such as magnetic hyperthermia for tissue cancer ablation, magnetoelectric stimulation of cells, enhanced diffusion of drugs and abrasion of tissues and blood clots. Our mini-symposium brings together leading experts to delve into various facets of this transformative field. Topics will span from advanced magnetic navigation systems to micro- and nanoscale tools designed for the transportation of therapeutic payloads, such as drugs and stem cells. We will also discuss the development of magnetically guided robotic catheters and endoscopes, as well as nanoscale actuators capable of wirelessly electrostimulating cell tissues. Particularly, we will explore how magnetic navigation systems can operate seamlessly in healthcare settings without requiring a complex infrastructure. The symposium will also discuss various designs for small magnetic robots, with an emphasis on biodegradability and biocompatibility, methods for tracking them inside the body, and strategies for efficiently controlling swarms of these devices. Additionally, we will show how advancements in materials can contribute to the development of dexterous robotic catheters that navigate through intricate blood vessels using magnetic navigation. The discussion will also touch on magnetic wearables and sensing technologies. Magnetic technologies go beyond the constraints of traditional methods, offering advancements in localized delivery, embolization, cell fertilization, and precise stimulation of difficult-to-reach damaged tissues. In this mini-symposium, we will uncover the potential of magnetic technologies and their pivotal role in shaping the future landscape of healthcare applications.

Organizers: Salvador Pané{2}, Denys Makarov{3}, Brad Nelson{2}, Li Zhang{5}, Hongsoo Choi{1}, Mariana Medina Sanchez{4}
{1}Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; {2}ETH Zürich, Switzerland; {3}Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Germany; {4}Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung Dresden, Germany; {5}The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

New Approaches to Understand the Spatial and Temporal Effects of Intracortical Microstimulation

Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) can be used to restore lost sensory function for patients suffering from neurological disease or injury. It is also a valuable experimental tool for the interrogation of neural circuitry. Several factors can influence the spatial and temporal effects of ICMS on surrounding neurons, including the stimulation parameters selected, the tissue response to the implant, and the design of the stimulating electrode. In this mini-symposium, we explore cutting-edge techniques to both understand and control the spatial and temporal effects of ICMS. Speakers will cover a variety of approaches, including computational modeling, spatial transcriptomics, in vivo imaging, and next-generation electrode design. The results presented extend on our current understanding of the effects of electrical stimulation in the brain, with impacts to both the basic science and clinical applications of ICMS.

Organizers: Erin Purcell{2}, Takashi Kozai{6}, Lan Luan{3}, James Weiland{5}, Karthik Kumaravelu{1}, Kevin Otto{4}
{1}Duke University, United States; {2}Michigan State University, United States; {3}Rice University, United States; {4}University of Florida, United States; {5}University of Michigan, United States; {6}University of Pittsburgh, United States

[Canceled] Next Generation Artificial Neural Network

The limitations of the Perceptron algorithm commonly used in neural networks propose the incorporation of an evolutionary artificial Neuroidal network to overcome these limitations. While the traditional Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is effective for solving linearly separable classes, it fails to capture the complexities and non-linearity observed in biological neural networks. In contrast, a neuroid, designed to mimic the operation of human brain neurons, offers greater flexibility by introducing additional parameters beyond weights. Patient’s, Doctor’s, Health Care Industry, advancement of health information technology and artificial intelligence. Any time variant system can benefit from the Neuroid concept like FinTech (Market Trends), Weather Forecasting( Predicting Tornado’s, hurricanes’, temperature extremes), HealthCare (automatically informing healthcare authorities and police upon critical health crisis). Programmatically, Neuroid Networks are defined with three matrices, called chromosomes. Together, these are called the Network Genome. 1. N-Chromosome – defines how many neuroids there are & to what layer they belong. 2. C-Chromosome – defines the connections between neuroids. 3. V-Chromosome – defines the parameters (Umbr, β, etc.) for each individual neuroid. Genetic Algorithm: For this project, we are using a modified genetic algorithm to evolve more successfully trainable networks. The basic idea is to remove the worst performers from the population and use the best performers to create the next generation population.

Organizers: Chaitanya Kumar Mankala, Dr. Ricardo Jose Silva
Villanova University, United States

Recent Advances in Bioimpedance As a Tool for the Assessment of Muscle Condition

In developed nations, demographic change is anticipated to influence society and economics in the coming decades. In particular, such aging societies must deal with age-related tissue varia-tions and neuromuscular diseases, most likely challenging the boundaries of the current health care system. Often applied manual diagnosis and therapy monitoring, which is demanding for both patient and therapist, must be replaced with promising alternatives that provide more muscle specificity to address age-related tissue variations, such as Sarcopenia. Recently, Electrical Impedance Myography (EIM), or more specifically bioimpedance meas-urements of the muscle, has gained interest in the scientific community. However, the standardization of the applied electrode array, the definition of feasible test protocols, and the interpretation of the acquired EIM measurements are still topics of research. In the future, EIM may address questions about residual muscle activity, muscular force devel-opment, and the patient’s intention of motion. The participants of this workshop aim to take a first step toward capturing the current state of knowledge about Bioimpedance as a tool for muscle assessment and addressing the challenges this approach is currently facing. Thus, shap-ing the pathway towards consensus to establish EIM as a new tool for muscle assessment.

Organizers: Steffen Leonhardt{3}, Todd Freeborn{4}, Seward Rutkove{2}, Alfred Hülkenberg{3}, Pan Xu{1}
{1}Fuzhou University, College of Physics and Information Engineering, China; {2}Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurology, United States; {3}RWTH Aachen University, Helmholtz Institute, Chair for Medical Information Technology, Germany; {4}The University of Alabama, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, United States

Recent Advances in Cuffless Blood Pressure Measurment I

Cuffless blood pressure (BP) measurement is expected to improve hypertension awareness and control rates and may now be feasible due to recent technological advances in, e.g., wearable sensing and machine learning. As a result, cuffless BP monitoring devices are being widely pursued around the world. However, there are serious challenges in achieving accuracy while offering convenience. This mini-symposium will cover recent advances in cuffless blood pressure measurement and represents part one of two. The speakers are leaders from universities, clinical centers, and companies and will present on topics including clinical validation of methods and calibration-free methods.

Organizer: Ramakrishna Mukkamala
University of Pittsburgh, United States

Recent Advances in Cuffless Blood Pressure Measurment II

Cuffless blood pressure (BP) measurement is expected to improve hypertension awareness and control rates and may now be feasible due to recent technological advances in, e.g., wearable sensing and machine learning. As a result, cuffless BP monitoring devices are being widely pursued around the world. However, there are serious challenges in achieving accuracy while offering convenience. This mini-symposium will cover recent advances in cuffless blood pressure measurement and represents part two of two. The speakers are leaders from universities, clinical centers, and companies and will present on topics including pulse wave analysis and pulse transit time methods.

Organizer: Ramakrishna Mukkamala
University of Pittsburgh, United States

The Success and Future Promise of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Ophthalmology

This minisymposium topic describing the ways in which AI’s robustness, interpretability, and portability is being advanced in ophthalmology is novel in that it will be the first-of-its-kind at EMBC to bring AI and medical experts together to focus on AI in a particular branch of medicine, especially one which is having so much success.  Both the engineering and medical communities that make up EMBS will appreciate such a minisymposium to meet key players in this field, build further collaborations, and add their expertise to the conversation.  Towards robustness, we will hear from Luminetics Core creator Dr. Michael Abramoff, whose invention serves as an example of an FDA-approved AI system which is now part of the American Diabetes Association’s Standard Diabetes Care for diabetic retinopathy screening.  To enhance generalizability, industry and academic partners alike are working toward federated learning infrastructures to enable training of AI models on datasets from multiple sites while maintaining local privacy.  Dr. Minhaj Alam from University of North Carolina at Charlotte will describe his work toward validating such federated learning infrastructures.  Toward portability, multiple teams are building low-cost, portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) devices which would make such imaging technology available to broader populations. Dr. Kaveri A. Thakoor, Director of Columbia’s new Artificial Intelligence  for Vision Science (AI4VS) Laboratory is developing AI technology which performs with high accuracy even on data collected with low-cost OCT devices.  Dr. Thakoor is also developing techniques for making AI more interpretable by training models to align with expert eye movements to enhance AI’s efficiency and to make its mechanisms transparent for clinical users. Dr. Ives Valenzuela, Residency Program Instructor and glaucoma specialist at Columbia, will discuss the role of AI and eye tracking in ophthalmic education.  Finally, to show the far-reaching impact of ophthalmology/vision science on overall body/brain health, we will hear from Dr. Serra Favila, newly-appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences at Brown University, on the role of eye movements in working memory and cognition. The symposium will be kicked off by EMBS President Dr. Paul Sajda and Columbia Ophthalmology Department Chair Dr. George “Jack” A. Cioffi.

Organizers: Kaveri Thakoor{1}, Ives Valenzuela{1}, Serra Favila {2}, Michael Abramoff{3}, Minhaj Alam{4}, George Cioffi{1}
{1}Columbia University Irving Medical Center, United States; {2}Brown University, United States; {3}University of Iowa, United States; {4}University of North Carolina, Charlotte, United States

Translating the State of Art in Brain Research to Clinical Care of Brain Disorders

Our understanding of the human brain over the past decades has been greatly expanded, thanks to the multimodal and newly developed tools for neural recording and neuroimaging. However, this vast amount of knowledge has yet to be fully utilized in the clinical care of brain disorders. This panel brings together five speakers, consisting of neurosurgeons, neuroscientists and neural engineers, to share their perspectives on the state of art and challenges in translating the latest discoveries into better patient care.

Organizers: Han Yuan{2}, Sharona Ben-Haim{3}, Thomas Penzel{1}, Catie Chang{4}, Lei Ding{2}
{1}Charité University Hospital, Germany; {2}The University of Oklahoma, United States; {3}University of California San Diego, United States; {4}Vanderbilt University, United States

Trustworthy Ai in medicine: Implications for data, Algorithms and Systems

Technological and computational advances have boosted our ability to collect and analyze patients’ data, thus promoting the integration of Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools in clinical settings. However, the potential impact of such systems on clinical decisions raises concerns about their trustworthiness. In this mini-symposium, we discuss different aspects that need to be evaluated in order to develop trustworthy AI systems. These characteristics will be examined at different levels, spanning from data to algorithms and overall systems. The presentations will encompass both theoretical considerations and practical scenarios derived from international projects will be outlined within the presentation. Beginning at the data level, we will discuss the characteristics of Real World Evidence, addressing how data collection and preprocessing can impact the fairness of AI systems. Drawing from the 4CE consortium’s pandemic-driven creation, aggregating COVID-19 patient data across countries, we share insights. We then delve into algorithm development for trust, emphasizing reliability, uncertainty estimation, and explainability. Analyzing the need for trustworthy Clinical Decision Support Systems, we share Brainteaser project experiences, whose aim is to collect environmental and clinical data for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis, and their clinicians.

Organizers: Giovanna Nicora{2}, Arianna Dagliati{2}, Lucia Sacchi{2}, Barbara Di Camillo{1}, Ioanna Miliou{3}, Riccardo Bellazzi{2}
{1}University of Padova, Italy; {2}University of Pavia, Italy; {3}University of Stockholm, Sweden